1. The first descriptions of clinical cases that might correspond to what we would now classify as ectodermal dysplasias date from 1792.
  2. Charles Darwin also cited cases of ectodermal dysplasia in a book he published in 1875.

    charles darwin
    Charles Darwin
  3. In 1929, Dr. A. A. Weech was the first to coin the term “ectodermal dysplasia” in the medical literature.
  4. The condition is defined by abnormalities in two or more of the following: hair, teeth, nails, skin and sweat glands.
  5. Ectodermal dysplasias can also affect parts of the eye, ear or other organs and body features which develop from the ectoderm.
  6. There are more than 180 different types of ectodermal dysplasias cited in the medical literature.
  7. Only 49 of the 180 syndromes are represented by families who are on the NFED’s database.
  8. 44% of the people the NFED is in touch with have only been diagnosed as having “ectodermal dysplasia” and do not know which specific syndrome affects them.
  9. The conditions affect both men and women and all races.
  10. An estimated 1 in 10,000 births results in an ectodermal dysplasia.
  11. Symptoms can range from mild to severe.
  12. The ectodermal dysplasias can be passed from mom to son, mom to daughter, dad to son, dad to daughter. How it is inherited depends on what ectodermal dysplasia syndrome the family has.

    The ectodermal dysplasias can be passed down from generation to generation.
    The ectodermal dysplasias can be passed down from generation to generation.
  13. The ectodermal dysplasia might be new in a child and neither parent has the gene for it.
  14. Scientists are testing a potential treatment for the most common type, XLHED, in babies right now in a clinical trial.

February is Ectodermal Dysplasias Awareness Month. Help us spread the word by clicking on the icons below to share this post! 

5 comments on “14 Things You Didn’t Know About Ectodermal Dysplasias”

  1. 1
    Heather McKelvie on February 6, 2015

    Reblogged this on EEC Chick and commented:

    February is Ectodermal Dysplasias Awareness month. Here’s an interesting post from the NFED blog. #7 is interesting… where’s everyone else hiding? 🙂

  2. 2
    Struggling to survive with ectodermal dysplasia | National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasias on October 9, 2015

    […] 14 Things You Didn’t Know About Ectodermal Dysplasias […]

    1. 3
      Anitha Gangavatiker on April 13, 2017

      Hi Vinesh, I am also one of them suffering from this syndrome. God has created us like this only to bring out our potential. Give your best to the society in whatever way you can and lead a happy and satisfied life as we are far better than people suffering from cancer and other deadly disease.

  3. 4
    What Does HED Look Like? | National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasias on February 23, 2016

    […] 14 Things You Didn’t Know About Ectodermal Dysplasias […]

  4. 5
    Annemarie lyons on August 4, 2016

    I www looking for a nice guy looking for love and it has to be Ectodermal dysplasia my age 46,and up I am a girl

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *